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Weaving between storms

I was very excited to attend an overshot weaving workshop at Red Stone Glen fiber art studio in western Pennsylvania – 7+ hours from home. 

First my car was declared unsafe to drive by my mechanic and had to be left behind for repair. We high tailed it up to Plattsburgh INTERNATIONAL Airport where I picked up a rental car.

I sorely missed my deer whistles en route while I saw live and not so live deer along the highways. And I missed my EZ Pass. Did you know it costs $15 to drive across PA. No bridges or tunnels, just highway with deer. I don’t appreciate how muc tolls cost when I breeze through in the 65 mph lane. 

And I spent 4 hours cautiously driving through this storm.   

But I arrived at my cabin on a lake at Gifford Pinchot State Park unscathed. And I never met the prey in my bedroom. 

  
I brought projects from home to work on in the evenings. 

  
I enjoyed mornings on the lake with coffee.   

And wove for 2 full days to make this beautiful overshot shawl. 

   
 Now I’m visiting my precious new grandson (and his parents) but may need to skedaddle in my rental car without deer whistles or snow tires because 10″ of snow is forecast at home!

These are a few fall shots from home. 

  
The mighty Boquet (that’s BO- kwet to you southerners) at sunset. 

  
Our local morning rainbow. 

  
Our cute little cabin in the woods. 

  
And at night.  

 Bet you can’t spot the deer in our yard. Get out the whistles!

 

Blazing through fall

The leaves changed color in breathtaking beauty and hung out for a while.  Now we’ve had our first snow and many, but not all, have fallen.

  
  
  
I haven’t said much about felines lately but they gave me a run for my money this month. My 14 year old cat, Loki, was  declared doomed by the vet. I almost left him there to be euthanized it was so grim. But I chose to bring him home instead. AND HE MADE A COMPLETE RECOVERY!  Lucky guy that one. 

  
While I was away playing with my new grand darling (thank you Shirley for that lovely phrase), Tim texted to say he couldn’t find little Elli and she was going to have to spend the night out. We don’t have lions and tigers but we do have coyotes, martens, fishers and bears, all of whom would find her little fat body a treat. Tim texted me, “Good luck Elli, good night Lynne”. She survived and came home to my call. Then stayed in for 36 hours. 

  
Friends and family chipped in and helped with the insulation layer of my earth oven. We “emptied” a few wine bottles for this layer and then I covered it with a clay-hay mixture. What fun playing in the mud. I need another layer to even it out. 

First I cemented a ring of river rocks on the base Tim helped me with. 

  
Then filled it with wine bottles and clay-hay. A good time was had by me but it was moderately back breaking. 

  
  

 

We celebrated by having the last of our single malt scotch from Tasmania in the cabin. Tim shanghaied me from my other projects to make insulated curtains to reduce the cold wind whistling through the windows and I got to see them hung on their cedar branch rods and brackets. 

  I’m knitting and felting a gaggle (15 pair!) of crab themed slippers for my darling daughter and an army of her friends. 

  

  But today I’m off to “work” to relax and fund my habits.  

Seasons come and go

Life’s been busy since we returned from Seguin. We drove home during changing fall colors, which are now reaching their peak. And we had sunny, seasonal days to enjoy them. 

 A cloud settled over Cobble Hill.  Canoeing at Great Camp Santononi in Newcomb.   

  Wagon ride to Camp Santononi.  Sunrise over the mountains on the day my new grandson was born. 

A new life!  I love conjoined carrots. 

I love my new grandson even more.    

Smokin’

Home sweet home. Back to work work and deferred projects. 

 I am getting ready to build an outdoor clay earth oven to bake pizza and bread. Tim collected clay, I collected river rocks and we both contributed  empty wine bottles – that was hard work. 

   
 I am building a base and will use the wine bottles as part of an insulating layer. The ideas and plans are from a book, Earth Ovens by Kiko Denzer. 

Today I evened out the holes I dug, cut the fence posts, leveled them, and ripped, cut, and attached joists. Gotta love a table saw. 

  Opps don’t look too closely. I temporarily removed a safety dohiggy to cut the posts. I think I have enough rocks but may need a few more wine bottles. Better get to work. 

   
 
It’s a little wonky but level in all directions. 

Yesterday I made a simple card weaving loom with the table saw. I intend to try it out at a workshop in Vermont this weekend.  

And earlier this month, I smoked a beef brisket on my Weber grill as described on the Cooks Illustrated website. I soaked it in brine, rubbed it with salt and pepper and slow cooked it on the grill for 5 hours. It was amazing. I’ve tried a couple of pizzas on the grill mostly to practice sliding it off the wooden peel for the new oven. 

This week my farm share included a roast beef, pork roast and spare ribs. Fire up the grill!

Goodbye Seguin

All good things must end. Our two week stint is over and it was a great one. We had all sorts of weather, nice visitors and completed lots of projects. It is also starting to get cold in a house  without central heat: 47 degrees f this am as the sun rose.    

 I donned a hat and gloves (both knit by me of course), and every sweater and jacket I had, and we carried our gear down the hill to meet Capt Ethan with the dinghy. 

   
 It was seamless trip ashore despite the cold wind and we met up with several friends before we left. I had my first meal out and used a flush toilet. Woohoo. 

I write this from the comfort of my own couch, looking forward to our next trip to Seguin.    

Paint chicken

You knitters are familiar with this concept – yarn chicken. I wasn’t sure if I had enough stain left to finish the fourth porch. So I played paint chicken. Not sure if there would be enough. By the end, I was practically licking the paint can. But they are finished and look spiffy. 

We had a wind shift today from SW to N and the flag got its knickers in a twist. 

  
 Tim was covering the battery for the new solar panel and I went down to caulk a window. He kept looking at me and laughing. I wonder why.  
  
There has always been a Davis weather station on the island. I liked it so much, Tim bought me one for home.  

  I was reviewing this year’s numbers. Maximum wind speed, 68mph, lowest outside temperature -7•f, highest outside temperature 81•f, highest inside temperature 135•f!!! Someone must have had a candle nearby. 

And tonight’s sunset seen from a different perspective. 

   
 
And to all a good night. 

  

Full gear

It took a little while to acclimate, reassess and see what needs to be done on Seguin. There’s always something. 

My door is finished and I’m very happy with it. I had to replace the board to the right of the door. I got to rip and cut wood on the first power saws I ever used, back in 2008. Here’s the reveal:

  
Once again I had a garter snake encounter but this was more of a stand off. It coiled and hissed at me because I disturbed its peaceful rest: around, under, and probably inside the pump house. 

  It got foggy.  Tim turned on the fog horn to lull me back to sleep – vhf 83, click 5 times. 

   
    
 We’ve had visitors this fall including some we’ve met on the island before. 

The Wednesday warriors arrived, just after sunrise, with a solar set up for the Clivus composting toilet down at the cove. It’s a good thing because without the fan the outhouse was less than its usual pristine self. Guess who got to install it? The support person at Clivus was awesome. I called him several times throughout the process. And we’re back in “business”.

  
   
 After the fog cleared, painting began. 3 porches and one to go. We had overnight guests; visitors can arrange to stay here through Friends of Seguin, who really appreciated and took in the whole island. 

In the meantime, Tim mowed, weed trimmed and kept the place in shape. We’ve run out of data on our plan so we spend the evenings reading, knitting or weaving (me) and playing cards and trivial pursuit. 

Here are my island creations so far. 

   
    
   
Shoelaces!

And then of course, there is always lots of sky watching. 

   
   

 

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